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Retirement planning is a process in which both spouses should be involved. Differences over retirement dreams, plans, and expectations can blindside couples. This has contributed to the rate of divorce among couples fifty-five and older, increasing and becoming more than the general population.

Below are 9 questions to ask your spouse to ensure you are in sync when planning your retirement.

1. Where do you want to live?

Do you want to stay in the same place or move to another house, state, or country? Moving is a big decision. The more this decision and its options are discussed, the better off.

2. What do you want to do?

Thinking about the perfect day during your retirement can help this process. It is advisable to list both your and your spouse’s top 3 priorities, whether it’s going on vacation or mountain climbing, it is important to list these activities.

3. Who do you want to do it with?

We often take our friends and family for granted. Living in the same place for decades can make it harder to leave behind to go and do your own thing. Settling into a new area can be a problem. How in tune are you with the culture of that community and the overall environment? Thinking through this issue and handling the move properly can help avoid any potential loneliness or regret.

4. How much will it cost?

Your answer to any one of these questions is heavily dependent on your answers to the others.  Too often people make the mistake of retiring based on their birthday instead of their bank account. Consider your answers to the above questions and begin crafting a retirement budget. How much money you will need in retirement is a function of what you plan on doing and where you plan on doing it. Make sure that the plans you are making with your spouse are compatible with your financial resources. If not, what does that mean? Do you need to change your plans? Work longer? Have a phased retirement?

5. Where will the money come from?

Retirement income comes from several sources, such as personal savings, private pension plans, and possibly a work pension. How you use these accounts and when you claim these benefits can greatly impact your money’s longevity and what benefits your spouse is entitled to if you die.

6. How healthy are you?

Health care and long-term care are major expenses and should be considered during retirement planning. It is important to discuss these factors with your spouse pertaining to how healthy and physically fit each of you are and how that will impact where you can live or what you can do.

7. When do you want to retire?

Some people can’t wait to leave their working years behind. Others find a great amount of meaning and satisfaction from work and plan on continuing to do it for as long as they are physically and mentally able. If you tend more towards the former and your spouse than the latter (or vice versa), you can see how conflict could arise. This is especially true if the job in question and the ultimate retirement destination are time zones apart.

8. What concerns or fears do you have about retirement?

Retirement is a significant change, and many of us aren’t wired to handle change well. Are there issues pertaining to money, relocating, leaving a meaningful job, being further away from family, or other transitional issues? Sorting through your fears and concerns and taking steps to alleviate them can go a long way toward easing the move into retirement.

9. Is there anything you absolutely want to do before you die?

The regrets of our youth usually stem from things we’ve done, while regrets later in life revolve around things we’ve failed to do. Is there anything that either you or your significant other wants to do, see, or accomplish before you die? Draw up a list and be as intentional as possible, so you can both spend your remaining years in pursuits that bring meaning and satisfaction.

Are your answers to the above questions compatible?

How have you done? Did you and your spouse’s answers match regarding the above questions or were there substantial differences? If it’s the latter, what can you do to reconcile your planning? The sooner you negate your differences, the sooner you will be able to put your plan in place and move into one of the most meaningful and rewarding periods of life.

Similar Article: Ready for Retirement: 5 Signs to Know

Conclusion

Retirement planning can be a tricky process to venture into, especially with your spouse, who might have views and preferences that are different from yours, therefore affecting the planning process. With the help of such questions, you and your spouse can get a clearer vision pertaining to what you two unilaterally want and what steps you need to tackle any raising issues together.

Retirement planning is a process in which both spouses should be involved. Differences over retirement dreams, plans, and expectations can blindside couples. This has contributed to the rate of divorce among couples fifty-five and older, increasing and becoming more than the general population.

Below are 9 questions to ask your spouse to ensure you are in sync when planning your retirement.

1. Where do you want to live?

Do you want to stay in the same place or move to another house, state, or country? Moving is a big decision. The more this decision and its options are discussed, the better off.

2. What do you want to do?

Thinking about the perfect day during your retirement can help this process. It is advisable to list both your and your spouse’s top 3 priorities, whether it’s going on vacation or mountain climbing, it is important to list these activities.

3. Who do you want to do it with?

We often take our friends and family for granted. Living in the same place for decades can make it harder to leave behind to go and do your own thing. Settling into a new area can be a problem. How in tune are you with the culture of that community and the overall environment? Thinking through this issue and handling the move properly can help avoid any potential loneliness or regret.

4. How much will it cost?

Your answer to any one of these questions is heavily dependent on your answers to the others.  Too often people make the mistake of retiring based on their birthday instead of their bank account. Consider your answers to the above questions and begin crafting a retirement budget. How much money you will need in retirement is a function of what you plan on doing and where you plan on doing it. Make sure that the plans you are making with your spouse are compatible with your financial resources. If not, what does that mean? Do you need to change your plans? Work longer? Have a phased retirement?

5. Where will the money come from?

Retirement income comes from several sources, such as personal savings, private pension plans, and possibly a work pension. How you use these accounts and when you claim these benefits can greatly impact your money’s longevity and what benefits your spouse is entitled to if you die.

6. How healthy are you?

Health care and long-term care are major expenses and should be considered during retirement planning. It is important to discuss these factors with your spouse pertaining to how healthy and physically fit each of you are and how that will impact where you can live or what you can do.

7. When do you want to retire?

Some people can’t wait to leave their working years behind. Others find a great amount of meaning and satisfaction from work and plan on continuing to do it for as long as they are physically and mentally able. If you tend more towards the former and your spouse than the latter (or vice versa), you can see how conflict could arise. This is especially true if the job in question and the ultimate retirement destination are time zones apart.

8. What concerns or fears do you have about retirement?

Retirement is a significant change, and many of us aren’t wired to handle change well. Are there issues pertaining to money, relocating, leaving a meaningful job, being further away from family, or other transitional issues? Sorting through your fears and concerns and taking steps to alleviate them can go a long way toward easing the move into retirement.

9. Is there anything you absolutely want to do before you die?

The regrets of our youth usually stem from things we’ve done, while regrets later in life revolve around things we’ve failed to do. Is there anything that either you or your significant other wants to do, see, or accomplish before you die? Draw up a list and be as intentional as possible, so you can both spend your remaining years in pursuits that bring meaning and satisfaction.

Are your answers to the above questions compatible?

How have you done? Did you and your spouse’s answers match regarding the above questions or were there substantial differences? If it’s the latter, what can you do to reconcile your planning? The sooner you negate your differences, the sooner you will be able to put your plan in place and move into one of the most meaningful and rewarding periods of life.

Similar Article: Ready for Retirement: 5 Signs to Know

Conclusion

Retirement planning can be a tricky process to venture into, especially with your spouse, who might have views and preferences that are different from yours, therefore affecting the planning process. With the help of such questions, you and your spouse can get a clearer vision pertaining to what you two unilaterally want and what steps you need to tackle any raising issues together.

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